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Planning a career change? Consider entertainment

Just not necessarily on the glitzy side

By ANNEMARIE SCHUETZ
Posted 9/29/21

REGION — Wannabe motion picture projectionists, take note: that line of work is projected to be the hottest of the hot jobs in the 2020s.

According to recent data from the Bureau of Labor …

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Back to work

Planning a career change? Consider entertainment

Just not necessarily on the glitzy side

Posted

REGION — Wannabe motion picture projectionists, take note: that line of work is projected to be the hottest of the hot jobs in the 2020s.

According to recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH), projectionist jobs will see a 70 percent growth rate.

Theatrical and cinema-adjacent jobs in general are going to do well. Ushers and ticket-takers came in third, with an anticipated 62 percent growth rate. Agents and business managers came in seventh, with a 46 percent growth rate, and costume attendants next at 44 percent.

In other types of entertainment, athletics as a job is expected to increase 38 percent.

Makeup attendants were in 12th place and entertainment attendants were in 15th place. Actual entertainers can expect 34 percent anticipated growth. Film and video editor jobs? 33 percent growth.

Growth doesn’t translate into great salaries, though. Projectionists make a median $27,490 a year, the OOH noted. Agents did the best at $75,420 median annual pay. Performers had a median $15.70 per hour in pay.

On the hot jobs list, who earned the most? Nurse practitioners did, at a median $111,680, and then information security analysts at $103,590.

Speaking of healthcare, considering the pandemic, one would think that the list would be at least half health jobs. One would be wrong. Only three appeared: nurse practitioners and occupational and physical therapists. (Do we count fitness instructors? They made the list, with 39 percent expected growth.)

Consider how cinema, sports and plays fared during the pandemic. Some thought the industry was dead. What’s driving the increase now?

“Employment of entertainment and sports occupations is projected to grow 22 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than the average for all occupations,” writes the Bureau of Labor Statistics. “Strong demand from the public for more movies and television shows, as well as the increasing popularity of sports, will contribute to job growth for the entertainment and sports occupations.”

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