Cochecton transfer station renegotiations

By LINDA DROLLINGER
Posted 10/16/19

LAKE HUNTINGTON, NY — If there’s frost on the pumpkins, it must be time for annual negotiations between Sullivan County and the Town of Cochecton for continued operation of the Western …

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Cochecton transfer station renegotiations

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LAKE HUNTINGTON, NY — If there’s frost on the pumpkins, it must be time for annual negotiations between Sullivan County and the Town of Cochecton for continued operation of the Western Sullivan Transfer Station in Lake Huntington.

Sure enough, Supervisor Gary Maas confirmed that the county has sent him a copy of last year’s transfer station lease agreement, along with a note asking that the town designate an individual to modify that agreement on behalf of the town. Maas, in turn, asked the town board at its October 2 meeting to draft a resolution designating him as the town’s agent.

Because the October 2 meeting was scheduled expressly as a 2020 budget-prep workshop, the three board members present agreed to take up the resolution at the board’s next regular meeting on October 9.

Sullivan County Department of Public Works (DPW) considers the Lake Huntington transfer station a temporary waste-management facility. The hundreds of households and construction contractors served by the transfer station from the towns of western Sullivan County and northeastern PA consider it a vital resource in environmentally responsible waste management. Not only does it provide affordable household garbage disposal, but the transfer station is a full-service recycling center as well—one of very few in the area that accepts electronics large and small for free recycling. Refrigerators, gas grills and other large appliances are also accepted there, as are construction waste and bulk items, for a fee.

Lease agreements between the town and county have changed in nature over the years. Initially, the town owned and maintained the site, while the county paid rent for its operation. Last year, the county opted to maintain the site itself in exchange for a smaller property rental fee. The county also made plain in last year’s negotiations that it hoped the town would agree to further reduction in rental fees, or face possible closure of the facility.

Maas said of the implied threat, “Some DPW officials are up for re-election this year; that could put the town in a better bargaining position.”

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