A male ruby-throated hummingbird perches near the feeder where he has just been seeking nourishment. The clear liquid in the feeder is a simple mixture of four parts water to one part sugar. It is not necessary for feeder fluids to be red, and is better for hummingbird health to exclude the red dyes that are often included in feeder mixes.

Hello Hummingbirds!

It’s that time of year when we’re busy prepping the garden or doing yard work and we hear it—the unmistakable buzz of an iridescent fairy bird flitting past, zooming and zipping, searching for sustenance from the funny-shaped feeders we’ve come to associate with that most beloved little creature—the hummingbird.

The great Hendrickson mystery

Here we are, after a long winter of tying flies, checking equipment, talking about it with friends, and generally chaffing at the bit. It is finally Hendrickson time in the Catskill’s. At least according to the calendar, hatching charts and previous years notes, it is.

TRR photos by Scott Rando
Bill Streeter “tosses” the young eagle at the start of a test flight. Creance (tethered) flights are a last step before actual release; if an issue is noted, the bird can be retrieved rather than having a bird that may not be ready for release escape and then not survive.

New hope for a young eagle

A wildlife rehabilitator wears many hats during the course of rescuing and rehabilitating animals that find themselves sick or injured. A wildlife rehabilitator is part bush-whacker, part EMT, and part caregiver and occupational therapist, among other things.

Dinner celebrates 10th One Bug

HANCOCK, NY — Friends of the Upper Delaware River (FUDR) will host its 10th annual One Bug event on April 28 to 30. The angling tournament itself, which takes place on April 29 and 30, is already sold out, but tickets are still available to the Friday evening kickoff dinner, featuring both a silent and a live auction, from 6:30 to 11:30 p.m.

TRR photos by Sandy Long

This red-spotted newt got a hand across the road to safety on a recent drizzly evening. While it is best to handle the migrators as little as possible, it is still better than the alternative. 

Road Tolls

It’s a rainy warmish night in the Upper Delaware River region, and while most of us are dry and comfortable inside our homes, other species are out and about, risking their lives while scurrying across roads toward their breeding grounds.

TRR photos by Scott Rando
The downy woodpecker is the most common woodpecker seen in the region as well as heard. One of its courtship calls is a “whinny.” Most woodpeckers can be attracted by seed or suet feeders. This is a male; the females have no red at all on their head.

Drumbeats in the woods

When March arrives and there are any trees at all around, many species of birds get an early start on breeding by trying to court a mate by means of calls. Calling birds are very apparent on even a short walk outdoors. If you listen, you can make out the tapping of woodpeckers as well.



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