Narrowsburg news

Let’s get through this together

By GREG TRIGGS
Posted 3/25/20

The situation in which we find ourselves is still evolving. Each day demands a new coronadjustment. I try to ignore my fear by being grateful for the safety of my family and friends. I try to be …

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Narrowsburg news

Let’s get through this together

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The situation in which we find ourselves is still evolving. Each day demands a new coronadjustment. I try to ignore my fear by being grateful for the safety of my family and friends. I try to be there for others who might be struggling more than I am.

My mom taught me to do that. She was awesome. I wish she were here but, at the same time, I am grateful she doesn’t have to see this. It would overwhelm her.

My youngest brother is mentally challenged: Hard for me. Harder for my parents. Hardest for him. When I would try to talk about it, my parents would say, “You know, it could’ve been you.” The implied message, there but for the grace of God...

In hindsight, I wish my parents hadn’t given me so many guilt-trip frequent-flyer miles. It would’ve been nice to process those feelings with someone, but that didn’t happen. The seeds they planted now have roots.

Matt and I have each other. We are together. I can see him, and we talk whenever we want to. We’re talking now more than ever, actually.

My brother lives alone and is the epicenter of my concern. How do we keep him safe? My parents are gone. I’m his co-guardian with my sister, who is 68 years old. They both live in Wisconsin, which has never seemed further away. I had been traveling when this started so I needed to self-quarantine, which I’ve been doing for the last 10 days. Going to my family just wasn’t an option despite the fact that I feel fine. They were already at risk. I couldn’t make it worse.

But those are just my circumstances. I’m not unique. We’re each going to leave this unprecedented time with a story.

When you see someone from six feet away, you have no idea what their concerns might be. The same is true in reverse. Yet I hear and read (thanks social media) so much judgment in the way others are reacting. To me, the answer is simple: Behave the way you would want someone else to behave toward the people you love.

Older friends, older siblings, challenged siblings—those are my worries. I tell you this not in the hopes of finding comfort; my life and situation are what they are—mine with which to deal. I share it with you in the hopes that you’ll be patient with others whose story you might not know.

Please be kind, be patient and treat them the way I hope others are treating my brother, sister and you.

The DVAA posted a wonderful film by Oriel Danielson, called Safe in Narrowsburg (aka, The Cyclops). It is a charming snapshot of who we were toward the beginning of this on March 17. Dale is parked on the shore of the river, painting in her pick-up truck, maintaining social distance. A nice guy is grilling a delicious looking rack of ribs. Parents are playing baseball with their child. Someone else is offering wisdom from the bench in front of the Tusten Cup.

Val is on Main Street with her adorable dog. Tommy wisely suggests “taking it one day at a time.” Doreen is rocking on her porch watching the world go by as her freshly laundered sheets flutter in the breeze. We are still us.

Narrowsburg is such a strong, wonderful community. Support local businesses. Thank the hardworking men and women keeping our services open. Let’s be sure to take the best of what we’ve been into what we’ll become. Let’s get through this together. 

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