Kim Olver’s column on gratitude resonates, and more

Letters to the editor, November 11 to 17

Posted 11/9/21

Kim Olver’s column on gratitude resonates

The article written by Kim Olver hit all the marks about being grateful. She reminded me that this technique can be a natural antidepressant …

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Kim Olver’s column on gratitude resonates, and more

Letters to the editor, November 11 to 17

Posted

Kim Olver’s column on gratitude resonates

The article written by Kim Olver hit all the marks about being grateful. She reminded me that this technique can be a natural antidepressant especially during “dark times.” She mentioned “a gratitude partner;” my sister is mine. When I complain about my life, she shares all that she is grateful for and instantly my brain searches for the same. If she forgets how fortunate she is, I return the favor.

There is one thing that will remain daily on my list: a roof over my head. Some people take that for granted.

Her piece was simply written, thus easily understood. Sharing the trials of her own life and how she eventually was able to use gratefulness as a cure, albeit a difficult one, mattered. Life can change on a dime, as Kim sadly, courageously shared about her husband’s death at the young age of 37.

I loved how she incorporated that being thankful is important to our mental well-being.

I have procured four more River Reporter newspapers (wish I had more). I am sending out the article to people who don’t know how to end their pity parties. Hopefully, after reading her story, they might get on the Grateful Train.

Her article is now on my refrigerator door—a daily reminder to find something, large or small, to be grateful for.  

Thank you, Kim Olver!

Sharon Gifford-Peduto

Narrowsburg, NY

Arbitration on Honesdale police contract only helped borough

Coverage (“Arbitrator weighs in on police contract,” September 30) of the labor dispute between the police and the borough of Honesdale suggests a lack of good faith on the part of the municipality—to spend more on negotiation/arbitration than could be saved on an arbitrator’s award compels the inference that a collective bargaining impasse did not exist.

The acknowledgment by the borough that it was already violating the staffing provisions of the prior collective bargaining agreement contributes to the likelihood that negotiations were not ripe for arbitration.

One of the most remarkable outcomes of that arbitration is the “increase of more than $3,000 annually” in health coverage contributions by the officers, which would appear to offset a significant portion of their raises. Hopefully, Honesdale wasn’t negotiating for improved employee morale.

John A. MacKinnon

Lackawaxen, PA

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