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December 25, 2014
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On the Road to Milford: History, elegance and charm

The Forest Hall Building was the original home of the Yale School of Forestry.


Dining
The Department of the Interior has placed the Historic District of Milford on the National Register of Historic Places. One of the buildings on the historic list is the Dimmick Inn (101 East Harford Street, 570/296-4021, www.dimmickinn.com), now owned by the Jorgenson family. Architecturally it reflects the early American republic. It is a Greek revival building typical of that time. Built in 1828 by Samuel Dimmick and rebuilt in 1856 after a fire, it stayed in the Dimmick family into the 20th century. It is a substantial three-story brick building with charming double white wrap-around porches. In days past, the stagecoach and early motor coach stop was at its door. Tradition carries on, with the New York City bus stopping there. Inside are several cozy dining rooms, and a wood-paneled bar area. If you are lucky, you can sit near a beautiful stone fireplace with a roaring fire on a chilly day—providing old fashioned ambience along with a casual American fare menu.

A very different but equally charming place is the restored Hotel Fauchere (401 Broad Street, 570/409-1212, www.hotelfauchere.com). It has a 19th-century European flare. Styled in Italian villa manner, the three-story wood frame building was established as a hotel by Louis Fauchere in the mid-19th century. He was a French speaking Swiss-born chef who had made a name for himself as a Master Chef at the original Delmonico’s restaurant in New York City. The Hotel Fauchere became the “in” place then, and was popular over many years with the rich and famous from politics and the early film industry. Fauchere’s family ran the hotel until 1976. In 2006, the charming old building was saved from ruin and lovingly restored by Sean Strub and Robert L. Snyder. The restoration is simple and elegant. The exterior is true to its period, even to its rocking chair porch. Inside the atmosphere is restrained simple elegance and the guest rooms are filled with luxury bedding. It is a special place to stay, or to stop in for dinner at the high end Delmonico Room, or the more casual downstairs Bar Louis. Both menus focus on unusual regional dishes using local fare, lovingly prepared and presented. It is a sophisticated treat in the country.