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Pain management? Don’t make me laugh.

Mariachi Tequila & the Dan Engvaldsen Trio were on hand to entertain along Main Street during the Roots & Rhythm Festival in Honesdale.


June 23, 2011

Last week, after participating in Prayers for World Peace at the Kadampa Meditation Center ( www.kadampanewyork.org ), I was approached by one of the nuns for a favor. Knowing that I drive a pickup, she asked if I could spare some time and help the Temple out with a dump-run, since they had a lot of refuse to dispose of responsibly.

Wanting to help, I ignored that little voice in my head that insisted on reminding me of the weird English idiom: “No good deed goes unpunished” ( www.usingenglish.com ). Casting superstition to the wind, off I went, with a truckload of large items, including an old broken desk that, when push came to shove, somehow backfired on me, and made a crash landing on my left side that left me slightly broken (delicate flower that I am) and suffering a fractured rib.

Unwilling to accept that the voice in my head (can you say Sybil?) created the reality, I pushed on. Taped up and wincing (Attorneys at Law) I put the truck in gear and attempted to move through it. I had been looking forward to seeing Forestburgh Playhouse’s ( www.fbplayhouse.org ) perennial favorite Loretta Swit perform her one-woman tour de force, “Shirley Valentine,” based on the book by Willy Russell.

Swit’s performance was (IMHO) really, really good. I was thrilled to find myself so immersed in the piece that the image of Swit portraying Margaret Houlihan for 11 years on the TV’s smash hit M*A*S*H was never even a part of the equation. A great blend of comedy and pathos, it made me laugh—and I also felt the character’s pain, literally.

Not wanting to tempt fate, I passed on an invitation to join friends at Friends (in Smallwood, NY) for a “rib-eye special” and drove off screaming as I changed gears, to hear local author Tom Kane read excerpts from his new book, “Bad Church, Good Church” at the Delaware Valley Arts Alliance (www.artsalliance

site.org) in Narrowsburg, NY. Kane, a former Catholic priest, speaks from the heart about his history with organized religion, his personal crisis of faith and the path that ultimately led him to leave the church and create this book, which is “the story of his journey towards spiritual enlightenment.”