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July 30, 2014
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Governor Cuomo provides important winter safety tips for preventing hypothermia, frostbite etc.

With frigid temperatures turning most of the Big Eddy into a field of ice, Governor Cuomo has issued tips for preventing hypothermia.


The World Health Organization recommends keeping indoor temperatures between 64 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit for healthy people. The minimum temperature should be kept above 68 degrees Fahrenheit to protect the very young, the elderly, or people with health problems.
Watch out for signs of hypothermia. Early signs of hypothermia in adults include shivering, confusion, memory loss, drowsiness, exhaustion and slurred speech. Infants who are suffering from hypothermia may appear to have very low energy and bright red, cold skin.
When outside, take extra precautions to reduce the risk of hypothermia and frostbite. Dress appropriately; ensure the outer layer of clothing is tightly woven to guard against loss of body heat. When outdoors, don’t ignore the warnings signs. Shivering is an important first sign that the body is losing heat and a signal to quickly return indoors.
For those with cardiac problems or high blood pressure, follow your doctor's orders about shoveling or performing any strenuous exercise outside. Healthy adults should always dress appropriately and work slowly when doing heavy outdoor chores.

Stay safe while heating your home

Take precautions to avoid exposure to dangerous levels of carbon monoxide.
Carbon monoxide (CO) is a potentially deadly gas. It is colorless, odorless, tasteless and non-irritating. It is produced by burning fuels such as wood, oil, natural gas, kerosene, coal and gasoline.
Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are similar to the flu but do not include a fever. At lower levels of exposure, a person may experience a headache, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and shortness of breath. Exposure to very high levels of carbon monoxide can result in loss of consciousness and even death.
For more information see:
http://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/emergency/weather/carbon_monoxide/ ("http://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/emergency/weather/carbon_monoxide/")

If you use a fireplace, wood stove, or portable kerosene heater to stay warm, be sure there is adequate ventilation to the outside. Without enough fresh air, carbon monoxide fumes can build up in your home. Never use a natural gas or propane stove/oven to heat your home. If you are using a kerosene heater, use 1-K grade kerosene only. Never substitute with fuel oil, diesel, gasoline or yellow (regular) kerosene.