Looking Back


Contributed photo

Looking Back 2/22

This being the week of President’s Day, it’s appropriate to note some historical connections between our area and our nation’s presidents. The historic Hotel Fauchère in Milford, PA, shown here, has hosted or fed a number of presidents, including both Roosevelts, JFK and Warren Harding.

Looking Back 2/15

Milanville is one of the most historically significant communities in the Delaware River Valley, the center of the Cushetunk Settlement, established ca. 1755 by the Delaware Company. While the original settlement was destroyed during the Revolution, many of the original settlers returned after the war.


Contributed photo

Looking Back 2/8

In the 1930s and 1940s, the cash crop that reigned supreme in the Catskills was the cauliflower. The cool evenings and warm days provided ideal conditions for the growing of the vegetable cousin of broccoli. With nearby New York City providing a lucrative market, dozens of local farms began growing cauliflower.

Looking Back 2/1

In 1846, Jacob Faatz, a member of the pioneer glassmaking family in Wayne County, founded The Tracyville Glass Works alongside the Delaware & Hudson Canal about two miles east of Honesdale (now part of Honesdale Borough). The canal provided convenient transportation to the lucrative New York City market.


File photo by Alison Cosham

Looking Back 1/25

This photograph from the January 25, 2001 issue of The River Reporter shows celebrants at the 60th annual Mistletoe Ball, organized by the Wayne Memorial Hospital Auxiliary at The Waterfront at Ehrhardt’s. About 140 guests attended, enjoying a buffet and dancing to the Northern Lights Band.


Contributed photos

W.W. Weston

Looking Back 1/18

Methodist minister Horace Weston of Connecticut was the pioneer preacher in Ulster and Sullivan counties, NY. When his health gave way in 1826, he moved to Ellenville, NY, and began to manufacture stoneware just as the Delaware & Hudson Canal facilitated distribution of his wares. Weston crocks and jugs were sold as far away as Scranton.


TRR file photo by Chris Conroy
 

Looking Back 1/11

The first Livingston Manor Ice Carnival was held in 1959 at Scudder’s Pond. Forty years later, in 1999, The River Reporter captured this shot of one of the student sculptures that have come to form a centerpiece of the celebration.


Contributed photo

Looking Back 1/4

Considering the rapid growth of railroads in the 19th century, it’s hard to believe that in the “Birthplace of the American Railroad,” passenger rail service was confined to the Delaware & Hudson Coal Company Gravity Railroad from Honesdale to Carbondale, where travelers made connections to the rest of America.


TRR photo by Tom Kane
 

Looking Back 12/28

This photograph of the Pond Eddy Bridge was taken by Tom Kane for our December 18, 2003 paper, and accompanied an article on a familiar topic: controversy over the replacement or reconstruction of the bridge.

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