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July 23, 2014
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CALLICOON, NY —The 2014 first annual Green Tourism Conference, held earlier this spring at Villa Roma Resort, showcased green technologies, materials, products and practices that are breathing new life into an old industry.

The ‘tiny house movement’ 101

The Tiny House Movement, sometimes called the Small House Movement, started out as much a social movement as an architectural one, and now it’s gaining even more attention for its low-cost housing options during tough economic times.

Do the math. You can buy a ready-made tiny house—I found estimates online ranging from $40,000 to $60,000—or you can purchase plans on the Internet to build your very own tiny house, usually for under $25,000. If you can forage building materials, you could do it for even less.  Read more

Living the simple life; A house built for one

An interview with “J” by ISABEL BRAVERMAN

“Imagine no possessions; I wonder if you can”

A house that is 10 by 12 feet sits on a piece of land near the Delaware River. Could you do it? Could you live in such a tiny house? That is what J is doing, living in a small dwelling that she renovated and moved on to her land. With the house she moved all her belongings, and soon realized that in order to live in a tiny house you have to downsize.  Read more

A chef with a garden of his own; Relishing summer’s bounty at Hotel Fauchere

MILFORD, PA — For years, chefs have been championing the local foods movement, buying from local farmers who provide fresh, top-quality ingredients. But how many chefs have their very own garden to work with? Chef Christopher Bates at Milford’s Hotel Fauchère does, and he says it makes all the difference.  Read more

The Catskills: Centuries of artistic expression ...and still going strong

During the summer of ‘69, I stuck out my thumb and hitched a ride from the Finger Lakes to Bethel, NY, in search of a music festival that like-minded hippies were flocking to—Woodstock. Little did we know that history was in the making, but by the time I arrived, the story had already begun to unfold and at this point, that tale has been told in books, films and songs that echo the sound of a generation and still inspire musicians and artists around the world.  Read more

Agritourism blossoms in Sullivan County; Local farms schedule summertime tours

Sean Zigmund and Cheyenne Miller are already deep into the 2013 spring and summer growing season, rising at dawn and working till dusk and still never quite finishing all that needs to be done. But offered the choice, they wouldn’t want to have any other job.

On a beautiful spring Sunday, I visited their farm, Root n’ Roost Farm (www.rootnroost.com) in White Sulphur Springs, NY. While Sean was busy working, Cheyenne kindly gave me a tour of their two-and-a-half-acre farm, complete with chickens, pigs, veggies and more.  Read more

A jewel of the Catskills: The Neversink Unique Area

The Neversink Unique Area, otherwise known as the Neversink Gorge, is a 5,466-acre tract of land encompassing the Neversink River Gorge and surrounding upland forest in the towns of Thompson and Forestburgh in Sullivan County, NY.

Administered by the New York State Department of Envrionmental Conservation (NYSDEC), this designated Unique Area first came into being in 1981, when the first 2,805-acre tract of land was acquired.  Read more

On the path of history; Touring along the D&H Canal

Whether you’re looking for scenic beauty, or perhaps you want to learn more about how our region was developed in times gone by, why not take a weekend and follow the trail of the old Delaware and Hudson (D&H) Canal? You’ll be exploring the remnants of our country’s early industrial and transportation history—the story of how, early in the 19th century, two clever entrepreneurs, the Wurts brothers, were able to bring Pennsylvania’s black gold—anthracite coal—to New York City.  Read more

Loving the Lackwaxen; Tribute to a tributary

Voted River of the Year in 2010 by the PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, the Lackawaxen River is known far and wide as a spectacular freestone mountain fishery. The Lackawaxen was made famous by the well-known western novelist Zane Grey. Grey spent much of his time out west, but it was in the village of Lackawaxen, where the Delaware and Lackawaxen Rivers converge, that he spent his recreational time. It was here that he penned the famous “Lord of Lackawaxen Creek,” written for the May 1909 issue of Outing magazine.  Read more

Managing the Lackawaxen River; For electricity and recreation

As my kayak hits the Lackawaxen and Delaware Rivers each spring, I am reminded of nature’s beauty and why I love living in this region of northeast Pennsylvania. Each time my boat passes a bald eagle nest or a screeching great blue heron, I appreciate the opportunity to recreate in such peaceful waters.  Read more

History converges at Ten Mile River; Remembering an ‘army’ that planted trees

There is a very good chance that, if you live in the Upper Delaware River region, you have conservation in your bones. We love the seasonal changes, the outdoors and the open spaces, and we realize what a treasure Mother Nature has given us.  Read more

ECCE Bed & Breakfast Celebrating Its 100th Anniversary!

This July, ECCE Bed and Breakfast will begin its 10th year operating as the area’s premiere B&B. Its unique location has been a key element for its success. Perched on a bluff overlooking the Upper Delaware River Valley, visitors get a true eagle’s eye view of the stunning river valley below.

In The Beginning  Read more

From a barn to a home; A dramatic renovation makes a modern living space

An original structure from an 1840s barn was left standing on River Road in Milanville, PA. Perched on a hill between dense woods and the Delaware River, the barn is rife with history as it was part of an old farm and a stop on the Underground Railroad. The building was on the brink of collapsing. If it fell, it would bring down its beauty and historical relevance with it. It was the perfect project for Joe Levine, an architect from New York City.  Read more

If I can build a raised bed garden plot, you can, too!

If I’d known how easy it is to build a raised bed garden plot, I’d have done it years ago instead of having a patchwork, haphazard home kitchen garden.

So, you may ask: Why not just turn over the soil in my backyard? Well, we tried that one, and here’s the thing…  Read more

A modern homestead in Welcome Lake

It was a cold and blustery March morning, and as I made fresh tire tracks through the light dusting of snow, I saw a mink dart across the driveway and under a rock along one of the three ponds at the Augusta Acres homestead in Welcome Lake, PA. It was too cold for the sap to be running yet, but the plastic tubes and hundreds of buckets lining the way to the house were ready for the sap to flow as soon as the temperature rose above freezing. In the distance, a small flock of ducks waddled along the bank of the frozen pond as if also wondering whether the ice would melt soon.  Read more

Not your great-great-grandfather’s river; How times have changed

We think of the Delaware and its tributaries as the locale of some of the very best trout fishing in the east, but the area and its angling would be unrecognizable to its earliest anglers. Even though the region remains relatively unpopulated, the river has been transformed by a series of man-made events. And although the angling is now perhaps better than it has been in many years (the 2012 trout season, because of an unusually mild and dry winter, will be remembered as legendary), it is far different from what it had been before settlement by Europeans.  Read more

Healthy waters, healthy fish; Biodiversity is the key

Freshwater makes up about 2.5% of the water on the Earth. This water is recycled through the hydrologic cycle and is the same water that our ancestors used when the dinosaurs roamed the earth. Our bodies are 98% water. All life is intricately connected and dependent on this finite amount of freshwater.

Biodiversity is the variability among living organisms and the ecological complexes of which they are part; this includes diversity within and between species and of ecosystems.  Read more

(Not so) secret spots; Finding a favorite spot

The idea and possession of a “secret spot” has been an integral part of the fisherman’s lore since the first hook was tossed in the water. All anglers have at one time found themselves in a special place, devoid of other humans but plentiful with their finned quarry.  Read more

Reading the Upper Delaware River; Fish where the Fish are

The beginning fly fisherman can sometimes become overwhelmed with all the information available on the sport from casting, to entomology, to how to read a stream. All of these elements can be broken down into simple and easy-to-learn parts that will make your days on the water enjoyable and productive.  Read more

Food Traditions - Jewish

Some people don’t have warm and fuzzy feelings about the holidays. Some people aren’t religious. My father is the first one and I am the latter. Now that the holiday season is approaching, what am I to do? As a daughter of a dad who is from a Jewish family, a mom from a Unitarian Universalist family and I not identifying with either, when I just want to enjoy some of the traditional foods associated with Hanukah? Answer: create my own “holiday.”

And that’s exactly what I did.  Read more

Food Traditions - Italian

A smile comes to my face as I remember past Christmases spent with my Italian family. We were lucky to have everyone—my grandparents, aunts and uncles as well as cousins from both sides—come together for the joyous occasion of Christmas Eve.  Read more