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March 31, 2015
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editorial

Seeking stability, continuity and a better vision

Honesdale Borough government needs some stability. Since the beginning of this year alone, three borough council members and a mayor have resigned. Yes, the borough normally has its share of turnover of elected officials who ran and lost in various elections, but in the past three-and-a-half years there have been an unusual number of resignations as well as sitting council members declining to seek reelection because of problems arising either from conflict on the council or from how the town does its business.  Read more

Learning to cope with the high cost of food

It will come as no surprise to anyone who does the family’s grocery shopping. The price of food just seems to keep going up and up, and leading the climb right now are meat and poultry, eggs and dairy, and fresh fruits. In the last five years, food price inflation has topped overall inflation, fueled by energy and transportation costs, weather events that impact agriculture, and the cost of processing, packaging and marketing food products.  Read more

Clearing the air, part I A little environmental history

Let me tell you a story, Son.

In the olden days (not so long ago), a Republican president created the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and signed the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act. That was back in the 1970s.  Read more

Time to fix our roads and highways

A common pastime these days in the Upper Delaware River Valley is grumbling about the current miserable condition of our roads and highways. Some people blame this on the rough winter we just had, but truth be told, many of those same roads and highways were in no great shape to begin with, due to years of neglect by both the Empire and Keystone states.  Read more

Remembering the fallen; Honoring those who served

On Monday, Memorial Day, people across America will pause to remember the men and women who died while serving in our armed forces. Locally, many of our towns will hold parades to pay tribute not only to the fallen, but also to honor those living who have served our country.  Read more

Do casinos deserve tax breaks?

Riding on the promise that a casino will boost their local economy, counties and municipalities in the Hudson Valley/Catskills are racing to compete with one another to win one, or possibly two of these moneymakers to locate within their borders. The jockeying for position in this kind of competition frequently includes offering tax breaks as a way to attract new businesses.  Read more

From ‘me’ to ‘we;’ Volunteerism, a noble calling

“The broadest and maybe the most meaningful definition of volunteering: Doing more than you have to because you want to, in a cause you consider good.” — Ivan Scheier (www.energizeinc.com/reflect/quote1s.html)  Read more

The changing face of agriculture; Why we need to support it

Agriculture is a foundation of our community, essential to our social, environmental and economic wellbeing, not only historically, but also today.  Read more

Since last Earth Day

Earlier this week, the world marked its 44th Earth Day, a day to celebrate this beautiful planet, our only home in the entire universe. But amidst our celebrations, anyone who’s followed the news since last Earth Day knows we also need to sound an urgent note of warning for earth’s future.

CO2 level breaks modern record
  Read more

The Delaware River: it’s everyone’s water

We who live in the Upper Delaware River Valley are lucky. We get to enjoy the natural beauty that surrounds us as a part of our everyday lives. The rivers and streams, trails and open spaces—from greenway corridors and conservation areas to acres of rolling farmland that we sometimes take for granted—also draw economic value from tourism dollars that directly or indirectly support many local businesses and benefit our rural communities. Historically, the river helped upstream communities engage in commerce downstream all the way to Philadelphia (and later to New York City via the D&H Canal), and though the industry has changed, it remains true today that the river we value so much is an economic engine.  Read more