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April 24, 2014
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editorial

A tale of two states: now, what about the river corridor?

Recently there have been two important but very different legal developments on the two sides of the Delaware River. Both are related to the ability of municipalities to zone the location of natural gas drilling. Both have a significant potential to affect the health and welfare of the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River.  Read more

The calm before the storm

As domestic natural gas prices trend downward to new lows, and companies like Chesapeake Appalachia announce cutbacks in production, an increasingly common refrain with regard to natural gas drilling in our area is “what’s the hurry?” There’s obviously such a national glut of natural gas at existing production and consumption levels that it will be some time before new wells are needed—or indeed, become economic, with current gas prices well below the costs of production.  Read more

The little experiment that could

Some ideas presented at the last SkyDog Supper Club by architect and Pratt Institute adjunct associate professor Meta Brunzema provide an interesting framework within which to think about the possibilities for the Narrowsburg school property.  Read more

Thank you, Congressman Hinchey

The news we received two weeks ago that New York State Congressman Maurice Hinchey plans to retire at the end of his current term saddened us on two counts. It is, first, a loss for the 22nd District, which he represents. But second, and even more importantly, it is a loss for the nation.  Read more

The wrong approach to a worthwhile idea

On January 26, in one of its first actions, the new Sullivan County Legislature decided to issue requests for proposal (RFPs) for the county’s tourism promotion contract, which for some years has gone, without competition, to the Sullivan County Visitors Association (SCVA).  Read more

The framework keeps shifting

An idea that would have been unthinkable four years ago has been gaining public traction. It is the idea that maybe hydrofracking for natural gas should be banned entirely—and not just in a single municipality, but in an entire state.  Read more

Sharing the forests

It seems like a no-brainer. If there’s a place where people can be expected to walk with their pets and children, you try to make sure that there are no hazards on or near the path that could cause them injury. It’s partly a matter of ordinary human kindness and partly a matter of self-interest. In New York City, for instance, if you don’t shovel and de-ice the sidewalk in front of a building you own, and somebody falls down and injures themselves, they can sue you. So you shovel the sidewalk.  Read more

It’s called ‘investment’

At the pleasantly amicable organizational meeting of the Tusten Town Board on January 3, we noted only one topic that foreshadowed potential conflict: the projected esplanade project. The project would involve building a boardwalk behind the buildings on Main Street, overlooking the river and connecting to the existing memorial park, which would also provide backdoor basement access to Main Street establishments.  Read more

What’s really at stake

Although we have written a number of editorials criticizing the Holbert Quarry expansion, that does not mean that we think the quarry should be shut down, or even prevented from expanding.  Read more

If you want something done right…

As we reviewed the events of 2011 to draw up a list of the things we think deserve celebration or condemnation, we couldn’t help but note a theme emerging: if you want something done right, do it yourself. Although there are exceptions to this rule, it seems that by and large most of the sources of inspiration over the past year could be found in our own backyard. This is a theme we’ve noted before in our year-end editorial, but it seems like this year it was more true than ever.  Read more