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17.6 °F
December 11, 2016
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Soup's on

At the farmers’ market in Callicoon, I had a short discourse with a vendor on the benefits of cooler weather on such crops as Brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower. The lower temperatures bring out the sweetness, she told me. It was a grey, blustery day, and I bought a beautiful specimen from a bin of cauliflowers to make cream of cauliflower and cheddar cheese soup. I hadn’t made the recipe in years, but recalled it fondly.  Read more

Looking Back

Damascus Township, the largest of the original townships created in 1798, is still the largest. Damascus was the site of many historic events, beginning with the first settlement of Cushetunk along the Delaware River. Joseph Skinner and his family, who arrived about 1755, were probably the earliest of the Connecticut settlers. Ownership of the area was in dispute, because King Charles II had granted overlapping charters to both Connecticut and William Penn. Joseph Skinner’s son Daniel ran the first raft down the river ca.  Read more

Narrowsburg News

On Saturday afternoon, November 19, Main Street was filled with cars and people as crowds of art enthusiasts flocked to the opening of the 12th annual Art in Sixes show at the Delaware Valley Arts Alliance. Over 100 artists are represented in this show, with over 500 pieces of work. The Art in Sixes show, where each piece does not exceed 6 inches in any direction, is another sign that we are entering the holiday time of year.  Read more

Lake Huntington News

It’s getting a little nippy out there, but the fall weather is so nice to be out and about. I stayed home this weekend to get ready for the holidays. My brother Teddy told me I was having Thanksgiving, so I had to get my house in order; little did he know he would be doing most of the work. I think I was a little rude to my family. I am a very picky eater, so I will make what I like, and I told them if they want anything else they have to bring it. I eat turkey, mashed potatoes, my mom’s sausage stuffing, string bean casserole and gravy.  Read more

Looking Back

Ice harvesting season in Lake Huntington, shown here circa early 1920s, used to take place in January or February, depending on thickness of ice. The first hole cut was large enough to hold a wooden chute. Blocks of ice varied in size, from 24 inches square to 22 inches by 42 inches. They were pulled up the chute to Otto Heib’s Model-T truck and horse-drawn sleigh. Fred Bischoff is running the ice cutter made out of a car motor and ice saw blade. Henry Maas’s Ford Flivver is in background. Carl Meyer has the pike pole. Archie Keesler is using an ice saw near the sleigh.  Read more

Narrowsburg News

The brilliant fall colors seem to be the grand finale of the growing season as Mother Nature prepares to rest over the winter. Gardeners work to prepare their gardens for this rest, and we all cross our fingers that winter will be mild. Besides composting all the frost-bitten vegetables and flowers, one is able to save seed for next spring. Not sure how to do this? Adrianne Picciano, The Dirt Diva, will teach “Seed Saving 101” at the Narrowsburg library on Saturday, November 19 at 10 a.m.  Read more

Looking Back

James Archbald was born on March 3, 1793 in Ayrshire, Scotland, to a family of shepherds. The family emigrated to the U. S. in 1805 when James was 12 and settled on a farm in New York’s Mohawk Valley. In 1824 he went into the canal and railroad industry, in 1829 replacing John B. Jervis as the general superintendent of the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, serving from soon after the D&H Canal and Gravity Railroad opened until 1854.  Read more

Love that pumpkin pie!

When I was a kid, my favorite part of Thanksgiving dinner was dessert. Pumpkin pie, that is. I like the flavor. I like the texture. I like it served with real whipped cream. And I especially like that the filling is a relatively healthy serving of protein, calcium and vegetable. And you know, if you’re gluten intolerant you can simply leave off the crust!  Read more

About change

We crave change. The media feeds us promises of being slimmer, younger, happier, richer, if only we buy this product, follow that program. Through many trials we have learned that change does not come easily. What blocks us from changing? What helps us to change?  Read more

Lake Huntington News

What a weekend! I was down in Queens for a family friend’s wedding—eight hours, so much food.

I am too old for this kind of partying, but I love to dance. So I had a great time, but afterwards my hips and back were not too happy with me. I wish I could do that kind of dancing every day; I am going to have to try 15 minutes a day of dancing. That would be good for me. On my way down on Friday, I stopped to see Fr. Bill. He is doing well and sends his love and prayers to all.  Read more

Looking Back

While researching the history of items donated to the Cochecton Train Station, the fundraisers we organized and all of the generous folks who gave their support came to mind. The Nearing Family, owners of Cochecton Mills, Inc., offered us the building that was used for storage. They planned to demolish it to make space. Fast forward from 1992 to August 18, 2001, when we had a grand opening and dedication. It was a great event.  Read more

Narrowsburg News

On Saturday, October 22 over 60 people attended The Narrowsburg Union to listen to Zephyr Teachout as she campaigns for a seat to represent us in the U.S. Congress. Putting aside your political views, it was a pleasure to see The Union being used to support an important community event. New, comfortable chairs filled the gym, and the attendees came from Narrowsburg and surrounding areas.  Read more

Looking Back

Early settlers along the Delaware often crossed the river in the course of their daily lives. For them, the river was not a state boundary but just one more obstacle to overcome to get where they wanted to go. For residents of Wayne County and the New York counties of Sullivan and Delaware, boats and ferries were the earliest means of crossing the river. Tolls were first charged to travel by ferry and carried over to bridges, which needed the approval of the state legislature to be built, but were privately owned. The Narrowsburg Bridge was the first to be constructed.  Read more

Lake Huntington News

My column this week is dedicated to the original writer of this column, Ethel Hulse, who passed away on October 9 (see death notice, p. 8). She wrote Lake Huntington News for many years before I took over writing the column in late 2012.  Read more

Looking Back

In 1999, the Weiden family of Narrowsburg, NY generously donated this carriage to the Cochecton Preservation Society. The old depot had just been enclosed with windows and doors after making its journey from Cochecton Mills about two miles away.

The antique horse-drawn carriage is also referred to as a doctor’s buggy. In 2002, Arthur Peck, also from Narrowsburg, took great interest in the old carriage. He offered to refurbish it, which required rebuilding parts, getting new straps and reupholstering. He warned that it would take two years.  Read more

Why do cats scratch?

There is no question that when cats scratch objects or even people it is not pleasant. But scratching is a normal behavior for cats and serves many purposes. Scratching serves to shorten and condition the claws, and more importantly, cats scratch to mark their territory. That mark is not only visible, but also conveys the scent of the foot pads. Some cats that are in situations of anxiety or conflict may exhibit increased territorial marking such as scratching and urinating. For cats that live primarily outdoors, scratching is rarely an issue for their owners.  Read more

Narrowsburg News

At the same time crowds gathered on Saturday, October 8 to demonstrate respect for the endangered honey bee at the second annual Honeybee Fest, the America in Bloom annual awards ceremony and symposium took place in Arroyo Grande, CA.  Read more

Looking Back

Although opened in 1829 for the transportation of anthracite from the coalfields in Lackawanna County to the terminus of the Delaware & Hudson Canal in Honesdale, PA, the D&H Gravity Railroad later came to include passenger cars. The D&H offered quick rides between Honesdale and Carbondale as well as excursions to the beautiful park built by the company at Farview.  Read more

Bee-sting allergies

Most of us have had the experience of being stung by an insect—most commonly in this area by a bee, wasp, or yellowjacket. The majority of us will notice a mild swelling at the sting site and a temporary discomfort that gradually fades away. However, for about 3% of the population—about two million people in the U.S.—a sting or bite from an insect can lead to an anaphylactic reaction that can be life threatening without emergency treatment. It is estimated that there are 40 to 100 deaths per year from this cause.  Read more

Lake Huntington News

Another weekend down on Long Island; this time it was for a very special reason: the Ordination of Laurie Stuart at the South Nassau Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Freeport. I was part of the ceremony and the Upper Delaware UU Fellowship was there as well. It was very interesting. Being raised Catholic I had no idea what to do—do I cross myself when I walk past the alter, do I receive communion? So I just sat back and took it all in. I love the drums and the songs they sang, the love and friendliness that filled the church. A great time was had by all.  Read more