Overcast
Overcast
62.6 °F
September 05, 2015
River Reporter Facebook pageTRR TwitterRSS Search

River Talk

Years ago, miners entered a mine to work, and sometimes they were accompanied by a canary in a cage. The idea of the canary was that if there was a low oxygen level or hazardous gas present, the canary would show signs of distress before the miners did; this gave the miners time to evacuate. Thankfully, modern innovations like portable gas meters and self-contained breathing apparatus have eliminated the need to sacrifice any more canaries. The job description of a canary, had it been listed by the mining company, would probably read “bio-indicator.”

Since March, I and thousands of other fans of the great blue heron have thrilled to the close-up observation of a pair of herons, and ultimately their five chicks, thanks to a live webcam hosted by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in Ithaca, NY.

Among the more enjoyable activities of summer are things like swimming in a nearby lake or river and enjoying a picnic under the trees. If you take a close look at the shoreline, however, you may see some snack-grabbing activity going on besides hamburgers and coleslaw.

Northern water snakes are our neighbors here in Narrowsburg, where we enjoy observing the heavy-bodied Nerodia sipedon living along the banks and in the waters of Little Lake Erie.

This aquatic snake can grow to more than 50 inches in length and swims easily across water, submerging itself to escape harm if threatened. Although it is not venomous, if provoked or cornered, it may defend itself by flattening its body and striking repeatedly. Not surprisingly, such bites can be extremely painful and can become infected.

When a friend called me up and said he had a northern flicker nest in his backyard in late June, I packed my camera and binoculars in anticipation of some good looks. Northern flickers, as most woodpeckers, are cavity nesters, and the cavities are frequently low enough on the trunks of trees to afford some excellent views of young being fed by adults.

While few would contend that the turkey vulture is attractive, most would probably admit that in flight, it is indeed beautiful and that it most definitely has some unique—and somewhat offensive—characteristics.

As those of you who didn’t travel to warmer climes for the winter realize, we experienced an overall mild winter, with above-normal temperatures and minimal ice cover on rivers and lakes. Indeed, during the 2012 annual Mid-Winter Bald Eagle Survey for New York State, there was no ice recorded on the river during the week of January 10, which is the usual target date for the survey. No ice on the river has only been recorded for a handful of times of the 34 years that New York has been participating in the survey.

UPPER DELAWARE REGION — Danilo Carvajal, 59, is the latest person in a long string of those who can thank Richard “Dick” Rhodes for their very life. While not directly rescued by Rhodes, Carvajal was saved by Erika Poston on her first day of service as a trained volunteer of the National Canoe Safety Patrol (NCSP), the organization Rhodes co-founded 30 years ago, and was passionate about, up until the day he died on April 17.

A couple of years ago in June, there was a motorcycle ride in New Jersey to benefit a children’s foundation, and I was riding with our local chapter of the Red Knights. We were on a rural road in Sussex County, when I spotted a doe and her fawn come out to the shoulder of the road maybe six bikes ahead of me. A split second later, the fawn shot across the road right between two riders. The fawn disappeared in the brush unscathed and the riders likely breathed a sigh of relief.

An interesting collection of exotic and domestic animals were featured at a recent Open Farm Day at Country Ark Farm (CAF) near Milford, PA. Run by the Ciancitto family and a group of volunteers for the past 23 years, the non-profit foundation provides recreational, pet and art therapy experiences for mentally, emotionally and physically challenged children and adults. CAF is housed on a 26-acre property which is home to an assortment of well-socialized animals that have been hand-raised for the various programs offered.