Broken clouds
Broken clouds
66.2 °F
July 12, 2014
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River Talk

Irene brings wild weather

As I write this column, I hear the hum of portable generators outside the window. I have power, but neighbors down the road are out and have been since Irene swept through the area on August 28. Tropical-storm-force winds blew down trees and caused widespread power outages throughout the area, and heavy rains caused flooding and washouts on roads. Several instances of residential flooding were reported, and many farm fields were flooded.  Read more

Contests for outdoor enthusiasts

We receive lots of positive feedback from readers about the photography that appears in the “River Talk” columns. Many of our fans are themselves photographers and very devoted to nature and outdoor recreation. Two upcoming photo contests may interest those who enjoy photographing their experiences in the natural world.

For those who like rambling with their favorite canine companion, the Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation (PPFF) announces its second annual statewide “Dogs in the Outdoors Photo Contest.”  Read more

March of the amphibians

The middle of summer is usually the dry time of year where watering is required to keep lawns and gardens in good condition. This August, however, we have had ample rain; enough to keep things somewhat moist. Rivers and streams are running a bit higher than normal too; it’s been nice to paddle the river without having to “ooch” over the shallower rapids and bars.  Read more

River talk: choose life

Talk throughout the river corridor lately has been focused on a series of preventable drownings in the Upper Delaware River—three within an eight-day period — and five since the season began. Had the victims been wearing lifejackets, they might be alive today.  Read more

Pollination: an important summer job

The warm days of midsummer bring forth many colorful blooms from ornamental plants and wildflowers alike. The brilliant colors of these flowers serve to attract many different species of critters; they feed or utilize the nectar present at the base of the petals. When animals harvest this nectar, they accidentally perform another important function: pollination.  Read more

Snow goose on the loose

For the past several weeks, a lone snow goose has joined a local flock of Canada geese in the Town of Tusten, NY. While the flock initially resisted the presence of the intruder, the mostly white goose persisted and has successfully been integrated into the flock.
According to the property owner, the snow goose has not yet attempted to fly. “It is funny to see it join the pre-flight practice stampede with the adult geese flapping their wings at a pitch run towards the pond, and there in the middle are all the gosling geese and one adult snow goose running for all they are worth,” she said.  Read more

The singing tree

It was a warm morning in early July when I took a walk to one of the beaches in Walker Lake in Shohola, PA. As I passed a small maple tree on the top of the footpath, I heard what sounded like a small bird calling continuously, except I couldn’t see the bird. A second look at the tree revealed a cavity about 15 feet high, and it was then I realized that I was listening to a begging call of a woodpecker from inside the tree.  Read more

Florence Shelly Wetlands Preserve

Well worth the scenic drive through the northwest reaches of rural Wayne County is a 357-acre Nature Conservancy Property known as the Florence Shelly Wetlands Preserve. This unique property boasts fields, woodlands, two wetlands, barrens, riparian forest, vernal pools, rock outcroppings, a stream and a glacial pond surrounded by a floating bog.  Read more

The day of the dragonfly

Pass near any lake, pond, or stream shore and it is not hard to spot dragonfly or damselfly activity. They are both members of the Odonata family, characterized by their dual set of large wings and their voracious appetite for mosquitoes and other flying insects. Different species of odonates emerge at different times of the summer, so there is always variety to be seen. For some people, dragonfly watching rivals bird watching.  Read more

Green herons gather

While one often encounters the majestic great blue heron along the banks of the Delaware River, the smaller and stockier, but quite beautiful, green heron is showing up with greater frequency in the region. Green herons present at this time of year are considered to be breeding residents.  Read more