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December 25, 2014
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Monarchs in a mess

This monarch, foraging nectar from a Russian sage bush during July of 2012 is a rare sight this summer. Not one was sighted during the 2014 Upper Delaware BioBlitz that just occurred, according to preliminary data.
TRR photos by Scott Rando


Dr, Taylor and others recommend planting milkweed in buffers, roadsides and other open areas if the monarch migration is to be saved. Locally, milkweed is frequently seen along roadsides where it is otherwise not present, especially in upland areas. Consider saving portions of this habitat from the mower where practical. Buffers around crop fields not only help monarch habitat, but attracts beneficial pollinators. If you decide you want to attract monarchs to your backyard, there are seed companies that sell milkweed (make sure the genus Asclepias is in the name). A good guide for collecting and planting milkweed seed can be found here: www.ourhabitatgarden.org/creatures/milkweed-growing.html.