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October 22, 2014
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March of the amphibians

This green frog hopped ashore away from its usual lake habitat, perhaps to hunt, or rid itself of parasites. After a rain, increased frog and toad activity may be noted; look for American toads, pickerel frogs and grey tree frogs among others.


August 25, 2011

The middle of summer is usually the dry time of year where watering is required to keep lawns and gardens in good condition. This August, however, we have had ample rain; enough to keep things somewhat moist. Rivers and streams are running a bit higher than normal too; it’s been nice to paddle the river without having to “ooch” over the shallower rapids and bars.
Rain also brings some of the amphibians that come out of hiding during and right after a shower. Most amphibians have moist skin and cannot tolerate too much time in a hot, dry environment. Take a walk after a rain down a forest trail, near a pond, or even near your lawn or garden and you may see a variety of jumping and crawling critters.