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April 24, 2014
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The Complete Tangler

One last cast

When I wrote my last column in August, I was very concerned about the wellbeing of my best fishing partner, Barbara Ann. It seems that while I was expecting a fastball, life was about to throw me a nasty curve. In the last six weeks, Barbara’s blood work has improved to the point where she takes her chronic myeloid leukemia medication just every other day. Meanwhile, my own physical condition has deteriorated so badly that I will not be doing any pitching in Clem’s Quiz, come the opening of baseball season.  Read more

‘Where shall we fish?’

By BART LARMOUTH

[Editor’s note: This is one of several guest columns, while TRR’s Clem Fullerton takes a hiatus from his column, The Complete Tangler.]

There is one constant discussion among fishermen when it becomes time to head to the river: “Where do you want to go?”  Read more

The last green drake

Boyd Corners Reservoir is the uppermost New York City reservoir on what was once the West Branch of the Croton River. Its outlet flows for barely a half mile before it empties into West Branch Reservoir.

Barbara and I spent many happy hours learning how to fish with a fly on this short stretch of water. There, in 1950, I caught my first trout on a fly. That fish took a Brown Bivisible, which was the only dry fly I was capable of tying.  Read more

Double trouble

There I was, sitting in my wading raft a bit below the bridge at Hale Eddy on the West Branch of the Delaware River. There were several trout rising sporadically within 30 feet of my raft. At this point they had disdained the fly that I had been showing them. I had been about to make another cast when I found myself sliding off the raft seat into the river. I went into the water as smoothly as an otter, causing nary a ripple. To my dismay, I found myself sitting on the bottom of the stream in water up to my waist.  Read more

My wading raft

In my last column I had written that I was expecting a “new toy.” This was an inflatable raft that I hoped to use while wading in a stream having a depth of two or three feet. Once the raft arrived, I eagerly opened the carton and spread the raft on the floor. It weighs 19 pounds, about eight or 10 pounds more than a float tube. The material is not flimsy vinyl. This raft is made to withstand both abrasion and bumping into river boulders. For 15 years, I have owned the full-sized raft that this company produces, and it is as good as new.  Read more

A new toy and flow frustrations

You might recall how I mentioned in my column of May 10 that while fishing in Lordville, NY on the West Branch of the Delaware River, I had taken an involuntary swim. I had not been wading for 10 minutes when my hips and legs went numb and down I went. This caused me to write that I needed to figure out a way to avoid this sort of problem in the future. Sooner or later, one of these frequent spills (12 in the last three years) would result in injuring myself, or my bamboo fly rod. I spent time looking through fishing catalogs for an answer to my problem.  Read more

Our ‘Frenchman’s Pond’

Have you read any of the books written by John Voelker? This gentleman was once a Supreme Court Justice of the State of Michigan. If not his book, perhaps you are familiar with his short essay, “Testament of Fisherman.” In all of his writings, he used the pen name Robert Traver. He burst onto the national scene when in 1958 he wrote the novel “Anatomy of a Murder.” The book attracted the attention of Hollywood. It was made into a movie starring Jimmy Stewart and Lee Remick. The financial success of the book allowed Judge Voelker, late in life, to devote himself to writing and fly fishing.  Read more

‘Yippee i yo ti ay’

Here I am in Texas, in the month of June. At a time when Green Drakes and pale Evening Duns are hatching on the Catskill rivers, this is no time for a fly fisher to be in Texas. Then why am I here? First off, my oldest Texas grandson, Matthew Buchanan Brown, graduated from the Westlake Academy high school on June 1. Secondly, my best fishing partner, Barbara Ann, has been battling Chronic Myeloid Leukemia for the past five years and this has taken a sudden turn for the worst. Her oncologist wants her to be nearby until he can bring her leukemia back under control.  Read more

Remember

On May 10th, the students at the Jeffersonville Elementary School released the brown trout fingerlings that they had been raising from eggs all winter long into the East Branch of Callicoon Creek. It seemed as if this was the most exciting day in the lives of these boys and girls since Christmas. Child after child received one of the little fish in a plastic cup filled with water. They carefully carried the cup to the creek and then slipped the trout into the water.  Read more

Wild or stocked?

On Saturday, April 27 the Upper Delaware chapter of Trout Unlimited (TU) was shown a PowerPoint presentation put together by Ed and Judy van Put. This program gave a fisher all the information needed to ascertain whether a trout was a wild fish, or a stocked fish. Ed’s beautiful pictures were sharp and showed how to examine and determine the origin of a trout. Judy van Put’s narration of the program reinforced what was shown in Ed’s photos. The van Puts are ready to put this program on for other TU chapters or conservation organizations.  Read more