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July 24, 2014
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recreation

Fishing

An interview with Andy Boyar

If you want to learn a great deal about shad, you could read John McPhee’s splendid book “The Founding Fish.” If you simply want to know how to catch a shad in the Upper Delaware River, just ask Len Caputi. How does he know when the shad run is on? Len replies with a twinkle in his eye, “I smell ‘em!”

Why we fish

The most captivating way I know to embrace nature and immerse yourself in another reality is to slip into a river or to jump in a boat and go fishin’. Just going fishing is its own reward.  Read more

Learning to Tie a Fly; ‘Up’ your game

When I first moved here in 2001, I’d never picked up a fly rod, let alone knew what fly fishing was, or what “matching the hatch” meant or other fly fishing lingo. Fast forward 13 years. I now know a lot more, but still felt I was missing a piece of fly fishing—tying my own flies. The Beaverkill Angler’s spring fly-tying class was the perfect opportunity to learn. What better place to learn how to tie your own flies than in the official Trout Town USA—Roscoe, NY?  Read more

Hidden Treasures of the Delaware

Whether floating or wading the Delaware River, swimming in or just gazing at its waters, the most compelling scenery, for me, has always been the view beneath the surface. The riverbed itself and all the engaging aquatic life there and within the flow have been what’s held my attention. And the picture is usually clear and captivating.  Read more

Muddy Waters; Fish sing the blues

Natural habitats like our forests and native meadows hold valuable soil in place. But when these habitats are disturbed and removed, leaving bare soils, as they are during construction activities, that soil poses a major threat to our local streams and the aquatic life that lives there. Erosion and sediment transport in streams is a natural process, but with so much disturbance (via habitat fragmentation, conversion of natural habitat to housing developments, shopping malls and other human activity), sedimentation in our streams and rivers has become the number one pollutant by volume, nationwide.  Read more

How to Successfully Land & Release Fish

You’ve hooked a nice fish. Line is peeling off your reel, adrenaline is flowing, and you start to fear you’ll lose the fish, a big one no less. If you want to increase your odds of landing a good fish, stop thinking you might lose it. It’s only a fish. Relax.  Read more

Wild vs. Stocked Trout: There’s a difference

The Upper Delaware River has become synonymous with the phrase “wild trout,” a term that may seem unimportant to the general public, but is of vital consequence to trout fishermen. Not only is a river filled with only wild trout in the northeastern United States a rarity; it is a major draw as well. But what is it that makes such a fishery superior to another? What is the allure of these wild fish?  Read more

Preserving and reinventing tradition

Long considered the birthplace of fly fishing in America, the Catskills offer dynamic opportunities to discover, rediscover and renew one’s interest in the sport. A unique combination of natural resources, proximity to urban areas and history leads to a bounty of hidden treasures, often in plain sight.  Read more

Loving the Lackwaxen; Tribute to a tributary

Voted River of the Year in 2010 by the PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, the Lackawaxen River is known far and wide as a spectacular freestone mountain fishery. The Lackawaxen was made famous by the well-known western novelist Zane Grey. Grey spent much of his time out west, but it was in the village of Lackawaxen, where the Delaware and Lackawaxen Rivers converge, that he spent his recreational time. It was here that he penned the famous “Lord of Lackawaxen Creek,” written for the May 1909 issue of Outing magazine.  Read more

Not your great-great-grandfather’s river; How times have changed

We think of the Delaware and its tributaries as the locale of some of the very best trout fishing in the east, but the area and its angling would be unrecognizable to its earliest anglers. Even though the region remains relatively unpopulated, the river has been transformed by a series of man-made events. And although the angling is now perhaps better than it has been in many years (the 2012 trout season, because of an unusually mild and dry winter, will be remembered as legendary), it is far different from what it had been before settlement by Europeans.  Read more

Healthy waters, healthy fish; Biodiversity is the key

Freshwater makes up about 2.5% of the water on the Earth. This water is recycled through the hydrologic cycle and is the same water that our ancestors used when the dinosaurs roamed the earth. Our bodies are 98% water. All life is intricately connected and dependent on this finite amount of freshwater.

Biodiversity is the variability among living organisms and the ecological complexes of which they are part; this includes diversity within and between species and of ecosystems.  Read more

(Not so) secret spots; Finding a favorite spot

The idea and possession of a “secret spot” has been an integral part of the fisherman’s lore since the first hook was tossed in the water. All anglers have at one time found themselves in a special place, devoid of other humans but plentiful with their finned quarry.  Read more

Reading the Upper Delaware River; Fish where the Fish are

The beginning fly fisherman can sometimes become overwhelmed with all the information available on the sport from casting, to entomology, to how to read a stream. All of these elements can be broken down into simple and easy-to-learn parts that will make your days on the water enjoyable and productive.  Read more

A Living from the River. Ray Turner's Delaware Delicacies Smoke House

Ray Turner makes his living from the river and it takes a lot of work. In fact, if you want to talk with Turner, you talk with him while he is working.  Read more

Easy Access, Plentiful Fish: Fishing the Delaware’s tributaries

You will find large trout rising on the Delaware and its East and West branches, but they’re fickle. Add to that the difficulty of access (unless you have a drift boat, pontoon boat or kayak, and can arrange a shuttle), and trying to catch a Delaware River trout can be, well, trying, even for accomplished anglers. Think patience, perfect presentation and having the right fly. One more thing: whether you can cast 30 or 80 feet, the fish are usually two feet beyond your best cast.  Read more

‘Crown Jewel’ of the Delaware: Rainbow trout

Rainbow trout are sometimes regarded as the aquatic Johnny-come-latelies of the fish-rich Upper Delaware River. But they’ve got a century’s worth of residency there.  Read more

A Year-Round Fishery: Bass, shad, walleye, stripers, perch, eels

The Delaware boasts a variety of habitats that help nurture one of the most diverse year-round fisheries in the country. Many do not realize that the border waters of Pennsylvania and New York remain open for catch and release fishing year-round.  Read more