Overcast
Overcast
39.2 °F
December 25, 2014
River Reporter Facebook pageTRR TwitterRSS Search

Did You Know

Did You Know?

This is a picture of the children attending the Atco School in 1940-41. A one-room school, it was located just across from Steep Hill Road on what is now Route 652 (was 106) about one-and-one-half miles from the Narrowsburg Bridge. Mr. Geist, the teacher at the time, taught all eight grades, shoveled the snow, swept the floors and kept the fires going in the wood stove. When the ice on the pond was safe, he sometimes took the kids skating in the afternoon. From the Grace L. Johansen collection.  Read more

Did You Know?

This is an ad that appeared in the local newspaper in 1935. Bowling was a very popular sport at the time. And during the Depression it was a rather inexpensive form of entertainment. A champion bowler, Mrs. McCutcheon came to Peggy Runway Lodge to give instructions and exhibitions. The Lodge had four bowling allies when it opened in 1929 and held contests and special events to attract customers. From the Ruth & J. Frank Behling collections.  Read more

Did You Know?

Pictured here on a sunny afternoon is the old Tusten Settlement Church, the only building still standing of what was a thriving community in the mid-1800s.

Tusten’s economy was tied heavily to the lumbering and quarrying business and had, at its peak, a saw mill, a grist mill, two stores, a tavern, a school and the Baptist Church, shown here. The lumbering and quarry businesses began to decline and with it the community. By 1920 it was no longer the prosperous place of its past. From the Grace L. Johansen collection.  Read more

Did You Know?

Pictured here circa 1923 are a few of the well-known folks in Narrowsburg’s history. These good friends are posing in front of the first cottage built by Ruth and J. Frank Behling. They are from left, Fred and Evelyn Rasmussen, Frank and Ruth Behling and George Oellrich. These young people often took walks together and enjoyed each other’s company.  Read more

Did You Know?

Here, pictured in August of 1919, is a group of fellows in the swimwear attire of the day, posing on a homemade spring board reaching out over the Delaware River just up above the Narrowsburg Bridge. From the Ruth & J. Frank Behling collection.

The Tusten Historical Society’s hours at the Western Sullivan Public Library, Tusten-Cochecton branch in Narrowsburg, are Mondays from 1 to 3 p.m., Fridays from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Did You Know?

Here, in August 1918, are folks waiting for the train at the Narrowsburg station.

In the right background is the Oakland Hotel, in business until 1926 when it burned to the ground. Hats for women were in vogue at the time, and here the two young gals hold their hats in hands.
From the Ruth & J. Frank Behling collection.

The Tusten Historical Society’s hours at the Western Sullivan Public Library, Tusten-Cochecton branch in Narrowsburg, are Mondays from 1 to 3 p.m., Fridays from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Did You Know?

This is a picture of the Hawk’s Nest taken in August 1918. The canal can be seen along the river on the New York side (on the right of the picture.) The Erie Railroad can be seen on the Pennsylvania side of the river (the left of the picture). Most use of the canal had ceased before 1900. By around 1875, the railroad had crowded out the canal’s position as a coal, freight and passenger carrier. From the Ruth & J. Frank Behling collection.  Read more

Did You Know?

This picture isn’t so old, taken August 2006, but it is, or will become a bit of history. This shows the dismantled lighthouse that Art Peck had just removed from the new island left in the Delaware River’s Big Eddy by a hurricane in the spring of 2006. Inspired by his wry sense of humor, Art had built and then erected the lighthouse on the island, a bit of land that had arched far out into the Eddy. Because of safety issues, it had to be taken back down. But it sure lightened the impact of the hurricane and made for a great many laughs. My granddaughter Katie joined me in the picture.  Read more

Did you know?

Here we see 12 young folks posing for a picture featuring the play they were producing called “Oak Farm.” Strictly hometown stuff, it was their way of having fun and providing some entertainment for the community. Circa 1920, the only ones I can identify are Fred Rasmussen, second from left back row, and Ruth Marold and Frank Behling seated in front. From the Ruth & J.Frank Behling collection.  Read more

Did You Know?

Lately the roads seem to be traveled by many motorcycles, and that reminded me of this picture. Here in 1919 is J. Frank Behling (later my dad) on his 1909 Harley Davidson. As his brother, my Uncle Chris, once told me: Whenever there was some new fad, your dad was one of the first to have one. At 18 years of age, he probably thought having a Harley was the cat’s meow! From the Ruth & J. Frank Behling collection.  Read more

Syndicate content