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May 29, 2016
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River Talk

A potential nemesis for newts

Since 2006, when white-nose syndrome first started affecting bats in New York State, people have become more aware of the threat that wildlife diseases pose on species in certain habitats. Steps were taken to restrict access to some known bat hibernacula in order to slow the spread of this fungal disease.  Read more

What’s up at the Narrowsburg Union?

While residents of Narrowsburg, New York observe the evolvement of the old Narrowsburg School into the new Narrowsburg Union, two somewhat unusual visitors have been watching the goings-on from atop a chimney at the building.  Read more

River flight

The third Saturday in February was a sunny, mild day along the Delaware River at the Lackawaxen confluence. This is a good spot to see wintering eagles from December into March, and Eagle Institute volunteers are present during weekends with spotting scopes and binoculars to help visitors in observing these majestic birds. It has been a mild winter with little river ice, but resident and migrant eagles can still be seen there with a little patience.  Read more

Pledging to protect our water

Countless individuals have worked with great dedication to protect the magnificent Delaware River—and other regional waterways—from a variety of potential harms. Sometimes that has called for heroic feats of activism to fend off the impacts of power lines, pipelines and natural gas extraction. In reality, all of the individual actions we take, based upon the choices we make, impact the quality of our water, and each of us can implement meaningful and manageable steps to minimize those impacts and protect our water.  Read more

Sailing in February

Sunday, February 7 turned out to be a decent day to be outdoors. It got pretty mild in the afternoon, with sunny skies and a high of about 50 degrees. With that in mind, I took the camera and went to see what I could see. Near the northern shore of Walker Lake in Shohola, PA, I found that a few flying insects were about, and a few stoneflies were observed. Tiny gnat-sized insects were occasionally seen, and as I went to see if I could find some that might be perched in shoreline rocks, I spotted the spider.  Read more

Picture-perfect Poconos

The joy of holding a sturdy, large-format hardcover book in one’s hands is only eclipsed by having that book be filled with stunning full-color images of the much-loved Pennsylvania Pocono Mountains by photographer Michael Gadomski. The fact that Gadomski is a third-generation native of Wayne County with a keen knowledge of Pennsylvania’s natural treasures, following a 25-year-career as a state park ranger and naturalist, serves to sweeten the deal.  Read more

Tracks in the snow

We just had what could have been a significant snow storm during the past month. The storm brushed to our south, however, and left us with anywhere from a dusting to six inches of snow. It was easy to clear off, but not quite enough to cross-country ski unless you were on a lake or a pretty smooth trail. The morning after the storm, I took my camera and went on some nearby trails to see what could be seen.  Read more

Forest confession

True confession—I am a nemophilist. And as a reader of “River Talk,” I’d hazard to say that you are probably one, too.
Now don’t be insulted. In fact, the term applies to “one who is fond of forest or forest scenery; a haunter of the woods; one who loves the forest and its beauty and solitude.”

We are not alone in our admiration, following paths forged by forest lovers like John Muir, who wrote, “The clearest way into the universe is through a forest wilderness.”  Read more

The January eagle count

January is the time for the annual Mid-winter Bald Eagle Survey, coordinated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The survey has just wrapped up. Most states in the U.S. participate in the survey, including New York and Pennsylvania.

This survey takes place during the first two weeks of January, with January 9 to 10 as target dates. Migrant eagles are in their usual wintering grounds from Canada by then and are counted by observers on foot, in automobiles, or by fixed- and rotary-winged aircraft.  Read more

The world at our feet

Winter has arrived, but the snow, so far, has been minimal. Should the day come when you catch yourself whining about the weather, crabbing about cabin fever, or getting grumpy over the lack of color in the local landscape, get ahead of the gloom by getting down, as in—nearer to the ground.

With so many things—at eye level and upward—tugging at our senses, it’s easy to lose track of the ground beneath us, and all the wonders we can encounter there. With a new year freshly here, set a goal to get to know what’s going on down in the zone where your feet usually hang out.  Read more

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