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August 22, 2014
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River Talk

A purple problem

A few years back, some friends and I went to a seafood restaurant in eastern Long Island for dinner. As we walked through the entrance, I noticed a rectangular planter in which were growing some pretty purple flowers. These flowers caught my eye for a different reason though; they were all of the invasive plant species purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria). Perhaps the owner or an unwitting landscaper saw the pretty flowers along a roadside and decided to transplant them, not knowing the undesirable qualities of this plant.  Read more

Time out (together)

Earlier this year, I heartily enjoyed serving as an environmental educator at the Lackawanna College Environmental Education Center (LCEEC) in Covington Township, PA. Traipsing through the forest, followed by children ranging in age from pre-school to fourth grade, peeking under rocks, poking along a stream bank, exploring a meadow, we focused on learning about habitats and the various species typically found in each.

It was wonderful to see the children absorbed in these outdoor experiences as their senses came alive. Often, we would hear one exclaim, “I wish I could do this EVERY day!”  Read more

Possible changes in store for eeling on the Upper Delaware

Anyone who has paddled or fished the Upper Delaware River has probably spotted one of the dozen or so eel weirs in the river. Located in shallow rapids, these weirs are v-shaped with a trap at the downstream side. Boulder-sized rocks are used to construct the v, and the rock obstruction channels eels down to the trap. Operating an eel weir is hard work and involves some risk due to river flooding during late summer and fall, when the eel harvest takes place. To gain an insight on eeling on the Delaware, visit Sandy Long’s October.  Read more

Magical mushrooms

As summer heat and rains combine, the Upper Delaware regional forests become a marvelous landscape of mysterious fungal life forms that bring to mind the magic of fairyland and folklore. Poking from moss-covered decaying trees, sprouting under the frothy wings of ferns, lifting the old leaf litter from the forest floor, mushrooms capture our imagination with their varied shapes, colors and textures.  Read more

Snakes in the lake

With the arrival of warm mid-summer days, many of us are taking advantage of the swimming and fishing opportunities in nearby natural waterways, and many people encounter wildlife of all types while in or on the water. The more interesting descriptions come from encounters with snakes—sometimes heard for example: “I saw a water moccasin on my dock yesterday.” The fact is that in our region, only two venomous snake species are found: the timber rattlesnake and the northern copperhead. Neither is particularly attracted to aquatic environments.  Read more

Turtles and leeches

While walking at Shohola Recreation Area in Pike County, PA recently, I came upon an Eastern painted turtle crossing a dirt road. I bent down for a closer look and noticed that she was sporting a leech brooch on her plastron, just below her neck. She certainly couldn’t observe the unattractive adornment, and I decided to relieve her of this parasite.  Read more

Monarchs in a mess

One thing I do around this time of year is check for monarch butterflies, usually by just walking down some nearby roads; there are a few milkweed plants growing off the side of the roads that will support caterpillars. I check some of the plants for the tiny white eggs that will eventually result in a new generation of monarch butterflies late in the summer. This year, however, my hunt has been in vain.  Read more

Bioblitz a blast

The second Upper Delaware BioBlitz was held last weekend, with the blessing of terrific weather, dedicated volunteers and an ideal site making for another successful event. Activities took place on property owned by the Boy Scouts of America, Greater New York Councils, at their Ten Mile River Scout Camp in the Town of Tusten, NY.  Read more

Local breeding peregrine falcons: Success and hardship

A few years ago, I talked to an old friend who spent his younger years in the Milford, PA area, and among his many exploits were the times he went to the bluffs along the river, just south of Milford, to watch breeding peregrine falcons. The peregrines at Milford and other places were soon in trouble. The state of Pennsylvania reached a peak of 44 pairs during the early part of the 20th century before the species was extirpated in the eastern U.S. Like eagles and other raptors, population declines were attributed to DDT and other organochloride pesticides.  Read more

Bioblitz bonanza

Opportunities to experience a BioBlitz abound in our region these days, offering a wonderful chance to learn about the natural diversity of a given site. A BioBlitz is an event where scientists and other volunteers gather to collect, identify, and catalogue every living thing on a demarcated property in a 24-hour period. The results are typically made available to the public following the collection period, along with various workshops and talks.  Read more

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