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September 30, 2014
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In Our Hands

Slow down, you move too fast

Years ago, my husband concocted the notion of instituting a weekly, day-long moratorium on driving. He called it a “No-Car Day.” We would do all our chores and errands on weekdays, after work. Then, on either Saturday or Sunday, we religiously refrained from driving, taking a kind of automotive Sabbath we honored and kept holy.  Read more

Waking up

On the night of May 26, my husband called me downstairs. He had been checking the radar weather map, and when the wind and lightning started, he knew I would be safer on the first floor of our house. "This is going to be a bad one," he said. Neither of us acknowledged that the horrific images of Joplin, Missouri were forefront in our minds.

Fear gripped me as we huddled against the storm, the likes of which I had never before experienced. You know what I'm talking about. You were there too.  Read more

Here kitty kitty

I love birds. They are the only wild creatures who present themselves so readily to us, singing us awake in the morning, building their nests on outcroppings of our own nests, inviting us to imagine a life that defies the gravity that keeps us rooted. They are signals of the wildness we are part of. And they are oh so beautiful.  Read more

Body and soul

A series of events recently led me to River Brook Farm, the organic farm closest to my home. In my attempt to conserve gasoline, I had never taken the 17-mile drive, since I don’t generally head up Route 97. But I had an engagement in Milanville, PA one Saturday in February, so I made a short detour to C. Meyer Road on the New York side, after hearing raves about Alice and Neil Fitzgerald, proprietors of the farm, and the certified organic crops they grow.  Read more

The Good Life

When the earthquake struck Japan, people in Tokyo were trapped because public transportation was disrupted. On the third day after the quake, people were taking the last remaining food from stores. After four days, severe shortages of food and water spread across the country. Then the nuclear reactor exploded.  Read more

Are you sure you want to eat that?

Writing last month’s column, I wasn’t sure what I found more disturbing—that hydrofracking giant Halliburton expected us to believe their new fracking system “made up of ingredients sourced entirely from the food industry” was safe, or that the food on supermarket shelves contained additives that could fracture shale.  Read more

Rest assured

You could almost hear the collective sigh of relief when, in November, 2010, hydro-fracking Halliburton announced the creation of “CleanStim™ Formulation, a fracture fluid system comprised of materials sourced entirely from the food industry,” calling it “an exciting new innovation in the field.” The announcement came, no doubt, as comforting news to millions of people who rely on the purity of the Upper Delaware River drinking water, and to millions whose water is drawn from the aquifer that mingles underground with the Marcellus Shale.  Read more

Where does it hurt?

Last month a friend of mine asked me for advice on how to properly dispose of her unused and expired medications and their packaging. She knew that improper disposal poses a threat to humans as well as aquatic and terrestrial wildlife.  Read more

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